Baby Wobbygong by Belinda Close Digital photography on glass My family’s favourite pastime is to snorkel at Pulan Pulan (Amity Point) at the end of Toompany Street, for mangrove jacks and other fish. When my husband and children dive there, my children swim amongst the baby wobbygongs, keeping their distance.  It took me a long time to paint this wobbegong, as I had to build up the surface until it felt like the skin of the shark — rough like sandpaper. This painting is meant to be rubbed very gently across the woobygong’s back, as this is how it feels in real life. I want people to see what a beautiful creature he is, how special he is, as the old wobbygong is so often forgotten. I want people to see that beauty, so I put him up there in bright red. The original painting entitled Baby Wobbygong (1020 x 720 mm) was painted in 2007 with synthetic polymer paint on canvas, and is now part of the Redland Art Gallery Acquisition Funds  us.

Baby Wobbygong by Belinda Close

Digital photography on glass

My family’s favourite pastime is to snorkel at Pulan Pulan (Amity Point) at the end of Toompany Street, for mangrove jacks and other fish. When my husband and children dive there, my children swim amongst the baby wobbygongs, keeping their distance. 

It took me a long time to paint this wobbegong, as I had to build up the surface until it felt like the skin of the shark — rough like sandpaper. This painting is meant to be rubbed very gently across the woobygong’s back, as this is how it feels in real life. I want people to see what a beautiful creature he is, how special he is, as the old wobbygong is so often forgotten. I want people to see that beauty, so I put him up there in bright red.

The original painting entitled Baby Wobbygong (1020 x 720 mm) was painted in 2007 with synthetic polymer paint on canvas, and is now part of the Redland Art Gallery Acquisition Funds 

us.

Sprit Spine by Belinda Close Digital photography on glass The Spirit Spine is taken from an original painting of a Hammer Head (5850 x 2050 mm) painted in 2007 with polymer paint on three plywood cut to the shape of the animal. Now held in a private collection. Pop’s story of the Hammerhead dreaming My name is Belinda Close. I come from a long of traditional Minjerribah women, my apical ancestor was Ngerie. I grew up at One-Mile, and was raised by my pop Collie and mums Joanne and Tilly, in an extended family way. My cultural values were inherited from them. My pop was a traditional fisherman. One of his many stories was about Old Man Hammerhead that he passed down through our family.  Back in the dreamtime lived this old ancient Hammerhead that roamed the foreshores of Minjerribah. This old man was seen in these waters as far back as our forefathers and he was regarded as one of our spiritual ancestors. Back then one of the traditional ways of hunting was our men hunting mullet fish with the dolphins in the winter months. If laws of the waters were broken he became very angry and prevented the dolphins from bringing in the catch. Instead he would drive the mullet out to sea. When the law was dealt with and things returned to norma,l he became happy again and would swim close when the women and children were wading, splashing his tail affectionately and pushing the feeding stingray in for the women to pick up.  sa. Nulla lectus ante, consequat et ex eget, feugiat tincidunt metus.

Sprit Spine by Belinda Close

Digital photography on glass

The Spirit Spine is taken from an original painting of a Hammer Head (5850 x 2050 mm) painted in 2007 with polymer paint on three plywood cut to the shape of the animal. Now held in a private collection.

Pop’s story of the Hammerhead dreaming

My name is Belinda Close. I come from a long of traditional Minjerribah women, my apical ancestor was Ngerie. I grew up at One-Mile, and was raised by my pop Collie and mums Joanne and Tilly, in an extended family way. My cultural values were inherited from them.

My pop was a traditional fisherman. One of his many stories was about Old Man Hammerhead that he passed down through our family. 

Back in the dreamtime lived this old ancient Hammerhead that roamed the foreshores of Minjerribah. This old man was seen in these waters as far back as our forefathers and he was regarded as one of our spiritual ancestors.

Back then one of the traditional ways of hunting was our men hunting mullet fish with the dolphins in the winter months. If laws of the waters were broken he became very angry and prevented the dolphins from bringing in the catch. Instead he would drive the mullet out to sea.

When the law was dealt with and things returned to norma,l he became happy again and would swim close when the women and children were wading, splashing his tail affectionately and pushing the feeding stingray in for the women to pick up. 

sa. Nulla lectus ante, consequat et ex eget, feugiat tincidunt metus.

Oodgeroo Noonuccal and Ellie Durbidge Digital photography on glass During the MBRS Public Art Project process Elder Uncle Bob Anderson shared his own stories and special relationship with the inter-tidal zone. Our discussions led to his recollection of this image taken in the Grey Mangrove forest near Moongalba in 1980. The image focuses on two women, Oodgeroo Noonuccal (Kath Walker) — Elder, Poet, Activist and Educator and Ellie Durbidge, third generation resident, founding member of the Stradbroke Island Management Organisation (SIMO) and, like Oodgeroo, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother.  Oodgeroo, now deceased, revealed her passion for her country through her poems such as the 1960 Understand Old One. Her home by the mangroves, Moongalba, was open to all those who came to learn. Ellie Durbidge continues to pursue her passion for observing and protecting North Stradbroke Island. My thanks are extended to Ellie Durbidge and the descendants of Oodgeroo Noonuccal for giving me permission to exhibit this image. The photo was published in the North Stradbroke Island “jellyfish” book written by Mrs Ellie Durbidge and Jeanette Covacevish. Visitors to the North Stradbroke Island Museum will be able to view the original photo, learn about the endeavours of SIMO, and view selections of the Oodgeroo collection currently being archived by members of her family. 

Oodgeroo Noonuccal and Ellie Durbidge

Digital photography on glass

During the MBRS Public Art Project process Elder Uncle Bob Anderson shared his own stories and special relationship with the inter-tidal zone. Our discussions led to his recollection of this image taken in the Grey Mangrove forest near Moongalba in 1980. The image focuses on two women, Oodgeroo Noonuccal (Kath Walker) — Elder, Poet, Activist and Educator and Ellie Durbidge, third generation resident, founding member of the Stradbroke Island Management Organisation (SIMO) and, like Oodgeroo, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother. 

Oodgeroo, now deceased, revealed her passion for her country through her poems such as the 1960 Understand Old One. Her home by the mangroves, Moongalba, was open to all those who came to learn. Ellie Durbidge continues to pursue her passion for observing and protecting North Stradbroke Island. My thanks are extended to Ellie Durbidge and the descendants of Oodgeroo Noonuccal for giving me permission to exhibit this image. The photo was published in the North Stradbroke Island “jellyfish” book written by Mrs Ellie Durbidge and Jeanette Covacevish. Visitors to the North Stradbroke Island Museum will be able to view the original photo, learn about the endeavours of SIMO, and view selections of the Oodgeroo collection currently being archived by members of her family. 

 
MUDFLATS by Bernadette Millison DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ON GLASS TAKEN AT LOW TIDE, FROM THE ONE MILE JETTY THESE PHOTOGRAPHS DRAW OUR ATTENTION TO THE UNIQUE SPACE OF THE INTER-TIDAL ZONE. IN THE GLARE OF THE MIDDAY SUN THE MUD FLATS REVEAL THEIR TRANSIENT YET INDELIBLE FEATURES, MOMENTARILY, FOR THOSE WHO ARE LOOKING — THE TRACINGS OF THE FLAT HEAD, MUD CRAB OR WORM; ABANDONED FLOTSAM AND JETSAM, AND THRIVING MANGROVE PODS ARE EACH PRECIOUSLY SOUGHT. GENERATIONS HAVE WALKED THESE FLATS TOGETHER, CUSTODIANS SHARING THEIR KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND OBSERVATIONS; FAMILIES AND FRIENDS CONNECTING WITH THE POWERFUL SPIRIT OF THIS PLACE.

MUDFLATS by Bernadette Millison

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY ON GLASS

TAKEN AT LOW TIDE, FROM THE ONE MILE JETTY THESE PHOTOGRAPHS DRAW OUR ATTENTION TO THE UNIQUE SPACE OF THE INTER-TIDAL ZONE. IN THE GLARE OF THE MIDDAY SUN THE MUD FLATS REVEAL THEIR TRANSIENT YET INDELIBLE FEATURES, MOMENTARILY, FOR THOSE WHO ARE LOOKING — THE TRACINGS OF THE FLAT HEAD, MUD CRAB OR WORM; ABANDONED FLOTSAM AND JETSAM, AND THRIVING MANGROVE PODS ARE EACH PRECIOUSLY SOUGHT. GENERATIONS HAVE WALKED THESE FLATS TOGETHER, CUSTODIANS SHARING THEIR KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND OBSERVATIONS; FAMILIES AND FRIENDS CONNECTING WITH THE POWERFUL SPIRIT OF THIS PLACE.

Saltwater Wind Chandelier Aluminium and stainless steel kinetic sculpture I chose to design a kinetic sculpture for the public artwork project because wind — direction and force — plays a major role in marine research. My educational background is Industrial Design so I thought it would be challenging to create a large lightweight structure which would function as a wind vane and also be an attractive shining spinning artwork, creating different patterns when viewed from the side or below. The foreshore position of the building is well suited to capture wind from a variety of directions. The function of the building is housing scientific research projects relating to the marine environment. The word marine to me is synonymous with saltwater. The sculpture is based on the patterns of the molecular structures, which combine to produce saltwater. The cups represent hydrogen and oxygen atoms and the central balls the chloride and sodium atoms.

Saltwater Wind Chandelier

Aluminium and stainless steel kinetic sculpture

I chose to design a kinetic sculpture for the public artwork project because wind — direction and force — plays a major role in marine research. My educational background is Industrial Design so I thought it would be challenging to create a large lightweight structure which would function as a wind vane and also be an attractive shining spinning artwork, creating different patterns when viewed from the side or below. The foreshore position of the building is well suited to capture wind from a variety of directions.

The function of the building is housing scientific research projects relating to the marine environment. The word marine to me is synonymous with saltwater.

The sculpture is based on the patterns of the molecular structures, which combine to produce saltwater. The cups represent hydrogen and oxygen atoms and the central balls the chloride and sodium atoms.

Rockpool Rhythms by Ali Braybooks Digital photography on lightbox The two photographs titled Rockpool Rhythms came from a series of images taken from rockpools on the island. I first became fascinated with rockpools as a child growing up on the beaches of Cornwall in England. Rockpools are a tiny busy city of sea creatures, seaweeds and shells of all shapes and colours. In a sense they also seem to provide a quiet haven of protection against the elements of climate change. As I sit in a rockpool with my camera and look through the lens I become aware of a host of ever changing lights, colours, shapes and patterns and just a slight breeze and ripple on the waters surface can change it all in an instant. Nature throws out a constant challenge to me to catch that next shifting, colour-filled image in her kaleidoscope!

Rockpool Rhythms by Ali Braybooks

Digital photography on lightbox

The two photographs titled Rockpool Rhythms came from a series of images taken from rockpools on the island.

I first became fascinated with rockpools as a child growing up on the beaches of Cornwall in England.

Rockpools are a tiny busy city of sea creatures, seaweeds and shells of all shapes and colours. In a sense they also seem to provide a quiet haven of protection against the elements of climate change.

As I sit in a rockpool with my camera and look through the lens I become aware of a host of ever changing lights, colours, shapes and patterns and just a slight breeze and ripple on the waters surface can change it all in an instant.

Nature throws out a constant challenge to me to catch that next shifting, colour-filled image in her kaleidoscope!

Moreton Bay Research Station (MBRS)Public Art Project, 2008-10

The MBRS Public Art Project aimed to:

– Develop public art that reflected the nature of the sciences that take place at MBRS and a vision for the future role of MBRS in the face of climate change.

– Offer professional development opportunities for local artists 

– Develop a precedence for innovative partnerships on the island and within UQ

– Encourage an understanding of the arts as an integral part of public life and places.

The MBRS Public Art Project was a joint initiative of station manager Kathy Townsend and Jo Kaspari, curator. Both women are island residents, good friends and passionate about the role arts and culture can play in increasing understanding of marine environments and it’s preservation.

Thank-you artists’ Belinda Close, Jennie Truman and Bernadette Mollison, Kevin Townsend Operations Manager, also project committee members Nick Mitzevich, Judy Watson and Ngugi elder Uncle Bob Anderson.

This project has received financial assistance through Arts Queensland from art+place Queensland Government’s Public Art Fund.