SOUTH GORGE and MAIN BEACH Clean 2017

As part of the Quandamooka Festival, we’re hosting two beach clean ups and you are invited.

Where: South Gorge

When: 8am Saturday, July 29 before YURA YALINGBILA (Welcome the Whales)

Also

Where: Main Beach

When: Tuesday, September 26, 8am to 12:30pm

Meet at the Causeway entrance to Main Beach, at the end of Alfred Martin Way. Vehicles with beach permit welcome and transport also provided to multiple clean-up locations from southern end of Main Beach, all the way to Jumpinpin.

What to bring: Appropriate footwear, sun protection, water and a great attitude! 

info@linesinthesand.com.au

Quandamooka Foreshore and Beach Clean-Up

"When I was a kid we collected shells on the beach, now it is rubbish!"  

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Quandamooka Festival 2016 will take place across the Redlands, Moreton Bay and Brisbane area, July to September and aims to deepen people's understanding of the Quandamooka, Moreton Bay.

Lines in the Sand North Stradbroke Island is a community based not for profit organisation, experienced in managing running environmental education projects by way of the arts. As such we have brought together an alliance of entities passionate about the health of Moreton Bay water ways, and for the festival will mobilise a task force to undertake a beach clean up project with enduring impact.

Over 12 weeks, 60 beach and foreshore cleanups took place. The resulting film documentary we aim to have screened on water taxi and vehicle ferries which transit across the Bay,

We hope an environmental project and film will become a part of the annual festival. The strategic mobilisation of volunteers through this project will be a template we aim to build on in the years ahead.

OBJECTIVES

- Conduct 12 beach clean ups across the Bay as part of the 2016 Quandamooka Festival, with a view to making this an annual event

- Mobilise volunteers through strategic partnerships with Straddie Camping and Moreton Bay Research Station, University of Queensland, Quandamooka Festival and Reef Check, Lines in the Sand volunteer database

- Encourage understanding of the Bay’s environmental significance by way of access to isolated locations

- Enhance the beauty of the Bay by undertaking a Bay wide clean up removing rubbish from our fore shores and beaches

- Educate participants about the prevalence of human waste that finds its way into the Bay, where it comes from and what individuals can do about it

- Tally rubbish picked up over the three month period across the Bay, in partnership with Reef Check Australia and Tangaroa Blue making these statistics publicly available

- Share a film documentary about this project and outcomes with those transiting across the Bay to and from the islands

- Increase appreciations of Quandamooka culture and Country amongst the broader community.

Our community partners include #ReefCheckAustralia, #QuandamookaFestival, #CleanOceansAustralia, #WalkOnByNomore, #TangoroaBlue

Hot Island Posters

Thank-you Dunwich State School students and teachers for your wonderful posters this year.. The standard was exceptional; the messages so well thought out and the artwork so diverse.

We started doing the school poster project way back in 2010, with the theme of community garden. Other issues we have discussed over the years include ocean plastics, the fresh water aquifer and we have had many guest speakers visit the school.

Some of the best posters produced over the years are now documented in our new look Environment Blog.

Thank-you Dr Jan Aldenhoven for visiting school assembly and classes to talk about the island fires and regrowth, also Uncle Norm from QYAC and the Gelati Shop for prizes.

Hot Island 2014

Fire

By Jan Aldenhoven

 January 2014 saw much of North Stradbroke Island engulfed in wildfire

No human life or human property was lost.

All those involved in fighting the fire and supporting those fighting did a magnificent job. The community pulled together to help each other. But what were the impacts on the bush?

The following article by Jan Aldenhoven first appeared in SIN March 2014.

Many plants are now sprouting from lignotubers, storage units held underground, or from epicormic buds that have lain dormant under bark. Grass trees pushed out green within days of being burnt. The sturdy seed capsules of some banksias are only opened by the heat of fire. Other seeds are stimulated to germinate by smoke.

Scribbly gum bark reflects heat, and the golden trunks stand in stark contrast to the charred fibrous bark of other species: two different strategies to protect the inner tree and its epicormic buds. Now the outer carapace of the scribbly gum is falling away and the shiny new skin beneath is adorned with bunches of new leaves.

Clearly plants know their stuff. They have been weathering fires for a long time.

The rains of the past two years ensured the peat beds of the swamps didn’t burn, providing a refuge for frogs and other aquatic life to burrow into. Eighteen Mile Swamp flushed green so quickly it was hard to believe it had been burnt at all. Other swamps were soon dotted with flowering trigger plants and sundews, taking advantage of the opportunities fire brought.

 

But there are concerns and questions

Sensitive species in fire shadow areas burnt: tall tree ferns and rainforest pockets. Elsewhere, grand old trees hundreds of years old succumbed. How well will mining-rehabilitation areas recover?

Long-term residents can’t remember a fire that burnt so much of the island at one time. Sixty per cent of the island was affected. Those animals that couldn’t find shelter were incinerated. Thousands died.

The Australian bush is adapted to fire but critically, different plant communities need different fire regimes. The periodicity and intensity are important.

Too-frequent fires will not allow some plants to mature to produce adequate seed. Too long between fires, and some species disappear. Too little rain after fire will exhaust plants.

Aboriginal people have been in Australia for some 70,000 years, and for 21,000 years on Stradbroke. Aboriginal burning practices have shaped habitat diversity.

In times past it seems very unlikely that Quandamooka People would have risked half the island burning in one hit. So what was their burning practice?

Piecing together and synthesising knowledge – traditional, local and scientific – is the challenge ahead. Climate change is giving us more frequent and more intense fires. We want to protect the townships and infrastructure, but no one wants to sacrifice huge swathes of bushland to do so. The process of review and planning is under way.

The months ahead could be an opportunity to tackle the fox and wild dog problem on the island. The local Wildlife Forum is working with agencies to come up with a plan.

In 2007, the drought focused our attention on the island’s hydrology. Now is our opportunity to understand more about fire for our own sake and that of the bush.

Help the bush recover

- Slow down and watch out for wildlife when driving.

- Stick to roads and designated tracks so not to disturb regeneration or spread weeds and disease.

- Keep dogs in an enclosed yard or on a lead except in designated off leash areas.

- Be aware of fire regulations and stick to them.

- Keep a tidy camp and dont let bins overflow, as this will encourage proliferation of feral animals that target native species trying to recolonise.

- Report sick and injured wildlife to 0407 766 052

- Report feral animal sightings and fox dens to 07 3829 8999

or email envirodata@redland.qld.gov.au

Daniel Bunce

About me.. I enjoy working hard, I get excited about challenges and will always take them head on. I spend my spare time riding my mountain bike cross country and competing in marathons like the epic. I love multimedia video and photography. Why Photography.. Photography inspires me, I like the freedom to be creative and tell a story in my images. It is important to push myself beyond the limits of my equipment and use photography to develop my personal interests in being an artist. My Dream Job in this industry… Documentary photography, I would love to travel the world capturing the story of landscapes, scenery, nature, cultures and events. I dream of amazing destinations I could photograph.

2012 Fresh Water Aquifer

Dragonfly

“STRADBROKE’S ENVIRONMENT DEPENDS ON ITS AQUIFERS”

Stradbroke is the planet’s second largest sand island, after Fraser Island. Over hundreds of thousands of years, sand has been blown by winds and deposited in dunes and valleys to create the island we see today. 

Beneath the surface lies a large freshwater aquifer that consists of saturated sand. In places like Blue Lake, Eighteen Mile Swamp and the island’s many streams and creeks, the aquifer comes up to the surface. The aquifer is replenished only by rainwater seeping into the sand. Blue Lake is called a ‘watertable window lake’ because it opens a window into the deep aquifer.

Some fresh water is held in more superficial (perched) lakes and wetlands, like Brown Lake, high up in the dunes, where a layer of cemented sand holds the water and feeds the lake. This layer is called coffee rock.

Everything living on Stradbroke Island, the forests and wildlife, the frogs, fish and insects living in streams and wetlands like 18-Mile Swamp, depends on freshwater from the deep aquifer, or from the superficial aquifers that form into perched lakes and wetlands.

Scientists who have studied the freshwater biology of Stradbroke’s freshwater lakes and streams have found new species never before known to science. One special insect is the dragonfly Orthetrum boumiera – a deep blue dragonfly first found at Brown Lake. It lives only around brown-water dune lakes on Stradbroke, Moreton and Fraser islands, at Cooloola and along the coast south to Lake Hiawatha in northern NSW. Another new insect species belongs is the caddisfly - Westriplectes angelae - first found in swamp near Blue Lagoon on Moreton Island, and in 18-Mile Swamp on Stradbroke.

The best way to look after the waterbodies where rare creatures live is to keep them as natural as possible – with clean water (brown and blue waters are both healthy), diverse surrounding vegetation and habitats for many aquatic and wildlife species. We must make sure that humans do not cause changes to waterways – no rubbish, no damage to vegetation, no driving of vehicles into the water, no washing dishes or people’s hair. Mangroves too are sensitive to disturbance; their exposed roots must be left free to exchange gasses with the air, their leaves left to fall and rot into food for crabs and prawns.

Daniel Bunce

About me.. I enjoy working hard, I get excited about challenges and will always take them head on. I spend my spare time riding my mountain bike cross country and competing in marathons like the epic. I love multimedia video and photography. Why Photography.. Photography inspires me, I like the freedom to be creative and tell a story in my images. It is important to push myself beyond the limits of my equipment and use photography to develop my personal interests in being an artist. My Dream Job in this industry… Documentary photography, I would love to travel the world capturing the story of landscapes, scenery, nature, cultures and events. I dream of amazing destinations I could photograph.

Ocean Plastics Posters

There are loads of things we can all do to keep our waterways healthy. Waterways include lakes and wetlands, freshwater streams and rivers that travel out to the ocean, and our underground water reserves (aquifers). What do you want to tell the world about how waterways are being affected in your part of Australia? Draw a line in the sand, and put your message into a poster design. Load it up here by June 5, for World Environment Day 2012.

These posters present a social and environmental commentary about human pollution of non-biodegradable waste (especially plastic bags and balloon plastics) and the devastating effect they have on the local coastal ecosystems including precious wildlife such as Loggerhead and Green turtles.

Daniel Bunce

About me.. I enjoy working hard, I get excited about challenges and will always take them head on. I spend my spare time riding my mountain bike cross country and competing in marathons like the epic. I love multimedia video and photography. Why Photography.. Photography inspires me, I like the freedom to be creative and tell a story in my images. It is important to push myself beyond the limits of my equipment and use photography to develop my personal interests in being an artist. My Dream Job in this industry… Documentary photography, I would love to travel the world capturing the story of landscapes, scenery, nature, cultures and events. I dream of amazing destinations I could photograph.

Welcome!

2014 Year 4/5 Dunwich state School

"Lines in the Sand runs an innovative awareness-raising program to highlight the island’s environment and look at ways to preserve it. Many themes are discussed at our online blog – such as the destructive fires of January 2014 that affected more than 60 per cent of the island; implementing the Nature First principle; impacts of plastics on island waterways and freshwater aquifer.

Read about each of these issues here and see the images school children have loaded up to the blog.

Contribute your insights and artwork to our 2014 interactive page.

Wild Life Stories Photos

Wild Life Stories, was a fun creative way of learning caring for Country through photography and filming.  Josephine Ellis and Barry Brown facilitated three photography workshops with Grade 6 at Dunwich Primary in April and May 2013.

We went outside (in the school grounds) and immersed ourselves in what was around us, and we found some interesting animals and plants to photograph.  Then we went back to the classroom to learn to edit the beautiful photos that the students took.

Daniel Bunce

About me.. I enjoy working hard, I get excited about challenges and will always take them head on. I spend my spare time riding my mountain bike cross country and competing in marathons like the epic. I love multimedia video and photography. Why Photography.. Photography inspires me, I like the freedom to be creative and tell a story in my images. It is important to push myself beyond the limits of my equipment and use photography to develop my personal interests in being an artist. My Dream Job in this industry… Documentary photography, I would love to travel the world capturing the story of landscapes, scenery, nature, cultures and events. I dream of amazing destinations I could photograph.

Fresh Water Aquifer Posters

These first four posters are collaborative art works made with Year 1, 2, 4 and 6.

Daniel Bunce

About me.. I enjoy working hard, I get excited about challenges and will always take them head on. I spend my spare time riding my mountain bike cross country and competing in marathons like the epic. I love multimedia video and photography. Why Photography.. Photography inspires me, I like the freedom to be creative and tell a story in my images. It is important to push myself beyond the limits of my equipment and use photography to develop my personal interests in being an artist. My Dream Job in this industry… Documentary photography, I would love to travel the world capturing the story of landscapes, scenery, nature, cultures and events. I dream of amazing destinations I could photograph.

Nature First Posters

Daniel Bunce

About me.. I enjoy working hard, I get excited about challenges and will always take them head on. I spend my spare time riding my mountain bike cross country and competing in marathons like the epic. I love multimedia video and photography. Why Photography.. Photography inspires me, I like the freedom to be creative and tell a story in my images. It is important to push myself beyond the limits of my equipment and use photography to develop my personal interests in being an artist. My Dream Job in this industry… Documentary photography, I would love to travel the world capturing the story of landscapes, scenery, nature, cultures and events. I dream of amazing destinations I could photograph.

Nature First 2013

Nature first means putting the natural world first, after our human interests. Nature first is the principle that underpins (or it used to underpin) how protected areas are managed in Queensland, including national parks. It’s called the cardinal principle – http://www.nprsr.qld.gov.au/managing/principles/ – and is embodied in the Nature Conservation Act 1992.

But the cardinal principle is now being eroded as our state government opens up national parks to harmful activities like cattle grazing.

In Queensland, less than 5 per cent of land is set aside as national park. A national park is a special place where nature is fully protected in its own right and for its own sake.

In selecting places to be national parks, the aim is to protect examples of all the different habitat types across the state, as well as significant landscape features, cultural sites and values and as many species of plants and animals as possible, our biodiversity.

On a world scale, Australia is considered mega-diverse in terms of species, and many are endemic. On Stradbroke there are species found nowhere else on earth, like the swamp daisy and the spike rush. Our island is also home to many endangered species like the koala, the swamp orchids, the glossy black cockatoo, tiny acid frogs, and Stradbroke is the last refuge for bonsai heathlands. Special landscape features include ancient parabolic dunes, diverse wetlands and a unique, pristine lake that has remained unchanged for 7000 years, Kaboora (Blue Lake).

Fifty per cent of North Stradbroke Island is protected within Naree Budjong Djara National Park (My Mother Earth). Additional special places still need to be included in the park, notably the catchment that feeds Kaboora, the last tracts of undisturbed high dune country and koala refuges.

For millennia, the Quandamooka people lived sustainably with nature on Stradbroke, and their traditional burning practices helped shaped the island’s habitats. Today they have joint management of the park.

To look after Naree Budjong Djara, we can

  • increase what we know about the island’s ecology and the needs of plants and animals
  • protect the aquifers from structural damage, unsustainable water extraction and pollution
  • keep to tracks to avoid erosion and sand blows
  • take care not dump garden waste, which smothers native plants
  • leave our dogs at home because they can disturb or harm native animals
  • look, listen, learn and leave only footprints
  • not take anything from the park because it’s there for nature first

Looking after nature simply makes sense. We depend on nature for clean air and water, climate regulation, soil formation, food, enjoyment, inspiration and cultural identity.

Let’s remember what the Quandamooka people say: we don’t own the land, the land owns us.

Daniel Bunce

About me.. I enjoy working hard, I get excited about challenges and will always take them head on. I spend my spare time riding my mountain bike cross country and competing in marathons like the epic. I love multimedia video and photography. Why Photography.. Photography inspires me, I like the freedom to be creative and tell a story in my images. It is important to push myself beyond the limits of my equipment and use photography to develop my personal interests in being an artist. My Dream Job in this industry… Documentary photography, I would love to travel the world capturing the story of landscapes, scenery, nature, cultures and events. I dream of amazing destinations I could photograph.